“Una chispa puede incendiar toda una pradera”, Mao.


1)And if the euro can dissolve, if the eurozone can go back to Deutschmarks and drachmas, then why should we have faith in any paper currency? The breakup of the euro won’t mean the breakup of the dollar or the yen or the real, but it sure would accelerate the search for a more secure depository of value than paper money. Even one that proclaims “In God we trust.”

2)El resto es aterrador. Los discursos de David Cameron o de Angela Merkel son muy parecidos a los de Herbert Hoover en 1932. Así que ahí no hemos aprendido nada.

?Que pasa con el papel moneda cuando deja de tener creyentes por falta de credibilidad.?

Cuando hace poco se produjo la crisis del credito bancario, se agoto “El Capital” de Marx donde se prevee esta crisis. Ahora que el Euro esta creando panico en los inversionistas que ya no creen ni en moneda de papel, ni en cheques, ni en bonos, tendriamos que releer la base cientifica de las tesis de Mao: 1)”Los imperialistas son tigres de papel” y “Una chispa puede incendiar toda una pradera”. Y el panico es fundado porque incluso se puede desplomar La Bolsa de Valores de Nueva York si el Bundesbank aleman no asume las perdidas del colapso de la Union Europea tal y como paso con el CAME de la antigua URSS cuando se derrumbo “El Muro de Berlin”. Gualterio Nunez Estrada, Sarasota, Florida. Fuentes: 1)”Te puedes secar las lagrimas con tu moneda de papel”http://money.msn.com/investment-advice/tear-up-your-paper-money-jubak.aspx?page=2)“Si España no tiene éxito en esta crisis, el euro tampoco lo tendrá”http://economia.elpais.com/economia/2012/07/02/actualidad/1341254272_531202.html

1)Changing the rules

Take a look at the Greek debt haircut, for example. As part of the rescue package negotiated with the International Monetary Fund, the European Commission and the European Central Bank, Greece forced its private-sector creditors into a “voluntary” 70% write-down on the value of their government bonds. The deal might have been necessary in order for European leaders to agree to fund a Greek bailout package, but it had several “trust-busting” elements, which were pointed out by critics at the time.

When was the euro created?

First, the haircut imposed an after-the-fact change of the rules. Because of this, if you hold the debt of other national governments, you’re entitled to wonder how the terms of your bonds might change in a crisis.

Second, the haircut was imposed only on the private-sector investors in Greek bonds. The European Central Bank did not have to write down the value of its significant portfolio of Greek bonds.

And, third, by imposing a write-down, the European Central Bank and its partners created the question of when it might happen again. The deal certainly raised the risk of holding sovereign debt in the eurozone.

And then there’s the breakup

Allowing the Greek crisis to go to a stage where a Greek exit from the euro is a real possibility has had a similar but even more profoundly negative effect on trust. Suddenly analysts are digging into the details of how the euro system works. Quite frankly, you no more want to know how a modern paper currency is made than you want to know what goes into a cheap hot dog. Analysts and economists digging into the euro system have been shocked, shocked, in tones that echo “Casablanca’sCaptain Renault, to discover leverage and risk in the system.

Santelli: Europe needs a fiscal union
CNBC’s Rick Santelli explains why he thinks the entire financial structure of Europe needs to be changed, with James Bianco, Bianco Research president.
 Santelli: Europe needs a fiscal union
CNBC’s Rick Santelli explains why he thinks the entire financial structure of Europe needs to be changed, with James Bianco, Bianco Research president.

Date 6/6/12,Duration 3:16,Views 1781

And once you head down that path, well, the scenery gets mighty gothic mighty quickly. We wind up with economists saying things like, “In a euro breakup Germany will lose to 20% of its GDP when debtors renege on their Target2 liabilities” or, “The official sector (read the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund) are owed 290 billion euros by Greece. Of that 120 billion amounts to Target2 liabilities.”

These are real issues only if 1) the euro does break up, and 2) levels of trust sink to such low levels that, like Byzantine mercenaries, no party in Europe is willing to trust the currency or its bookkeeping systems. Even in the event of a euro breakup, the Bundesbank could simply print money or write itself a check, in the words of University College Dublin economics professor Karl Whelan, to cover what it’s owed. That would seem a reasonable alternative to trying to extract 576 billion euros (or whatevers) from German taxpayers to cover what is, from one perspective, a bookkeeping entity.

Of course, you can do things like print money or write yourself a check (and then not cash it, of course) only if trust in the system hasn’t vanished. As the slow runs on Spanish banks (and the not-so-slow runs on Greek banks) demonstrate, though, there’s not a lot of trust in the eurozone financial system.

And I think we’re only a resentful and shortsighted Greek election result — and a ham-handed political reaction from the German, Finnish, Austrian and Dutch governments — away from a decisive erosion in trust in the euro. The European Central Bank has already made it clear that it is not prepared to be a Federal Reserve-style lender of last resort.

So who, exactly, does stand behind the euro? Not eurozone governments, it’s clear — they can’t agree to issue joint eurobonds. Not the Bundesbank, the strongest of the national central banks, which clearly thinks it has done enough.

Click here to become a fan of MSN Money on Facebook

So who, then, thinks the euro is worth defending and who would spend some billions on defense if that were what it took?

Paper poses

And if the euro can dissolve, if the eurozone can go back to Deutschmarks and drachmas, then why should we have faith in any paper currency? The breakup of the euro won’t mean the breakup of the dollar or the yen or the real, but it sure would accelerate the search for a more secure depository of value than paper money. Even one that proclaims “In God we trust.”

Tangled and off target

And that’s not the end of the European Central Bank’s liabilities. There’s also something called the Target2 Balance. (Target stands for Trans-European Automated Real-Time Gross Settlement Express Transfer System. Apparently the “s” in “settlement” is silent.) Target2 handles payments among banks in the eurozone and imbalances among eurozone members.

When was the euro created?

 

Membership in Target2 is mandatory for countries in the eurozone. Membership is open to European Union members that don’t use the euro. Six non-eurozone central banks use Target2.

On one level, Target2 is a settlement system. On this level, the system works like this: European banks maintain accounts with their national central banks. When, say, a Spanish importer places an order with a German exporter and asks its bank to pay that exporter, the importer’s Spanish bank transfers money to the German bank account of the exporter. The Target2 system debits the Spanish bank’s account at the Spanish central bank, the Banco de España, and credits the receiving German bank at Germany’s central bank, the Bundesbank. The Spanish and German companies settle their credits and debits with their respective banks, which then settle with their respective national central banks. The two central banks settle their accounts, not by transferring actual assets (cash, for instance) but through liabilities and credits in the Target2 system. The Banco de España winds up with a liability and the Bundesbank with a credit

But on another level, Target2 is an automatic funding system designed to cover trade imbalances among eurozone members. If a country — let’s say Spain again — imports more than it exports, it winds up with a big, and growing, liability in the Target2 system. But doesn’t have to transfer cash or other assets to the Bundesbank to settle those liabilities. It, in essence, winds up owing the Target2 system, which has, in turn, created a liability that is ultimately due to the Bundesbank, but that in the short term is actually funded by the Target2 system.

I think you can guess what has happened in recent years to Target2 liabilities and credits as the eurozone’s weaker economies lost competitiveness and imported much more than they exported to Europe’s stronger economies. The Target2 liabilities for the eurozone’s peripheral economies, including Greece, Italy, Spain, Portugal and Ireland, climbed by 150 billion euros in April to 770 billion euros. I don’t have exactly comparable figures for the credits run up in the Target2 system by the eurozone’s stronger exporters, but in February the Bundesbank showed a positive credit balance of 576 billion euros.

Trust is the tipping point

There’s nothing magical about any of these numbers. There’s no reason that a 1.9 trillion euro balance sheet — the size of the European Central Bank balance sheet a year ago — should be economically viable and a 3 trillion euro balance sheet shouldn’t be, or that a 620 billion euro Target2 liability should be supportable and a 770 billion euro liability shouldn’t be. So why panic now?

In the end, it comes down to trust.

Click here to become a fan of MSN Money on Facebook

 

If those Byzantine mercenaries had been willing to accept the debased solidus in 1050 as good money, the fact that it was only 10% gold wouldn’t have mattered. Likewise, if the national central banks of Europe are willing to backstop the European Central Bank and, more importantly, if everybody in the financial markets is willing to trust that willingness, the fact that the European Central Bank has just 6.5 billion euros in capital becomes irrelevant. If banks and everybody in the financial markets believe that the Bundesbank and other Target2 creditors are willing to keep letting other central banks run up their liabilities, then the Target2 system is as good as gold. And the euro is solid.

But it works only if the trust in the system is there.

And it’s here that the leaders of the eurozone have done real damage to their “money” in the way that they’ve handled this crisis.

Changing the rules

Take a look at the Greek debt haircut, for example. As part of the rescue package negotiated with the International Monetary Fund, the European Commission and the European Central Bank, Greece forced its private-sector creditors into a “voluntary” 70% write-down on the value of their government bonds. The deal might have been necessary in order for European leaders to agree to fund a Greek bailout package, but it had several “trust-busting” elements, which were pointed out by critics at the time.

When was the euro created?

 

First, the haircut imposed an after-the-fact change of the rules. Because of this, if you hold the debt of other national governments, you’re entitled to wonder how the terms of your bonds might change in a crisis.

Second, the haircut was imposed only on the private-sector investors in Greek bonds. The European Central Bank did not have to write down the value of its significant portfolio of Greek bonds.

And, third, by imposing a write-down, the European Central Bank and its partners created the question of when it might happen again. The deal certainly raised the risk of holding sovereign debt in the eurozone.

And then there’s the breakup

Allowing the Greek crisis to go to a stage where a Greek exit from the euro is a real possibility has had a similar but even more profoundly negative effect on trust. Suddenly analysts are digging into the details of how the euro system works. Quite frankly, you no more want to know how a modern paper currency is made than you want to know what goes into a cheap hot dog. Analysts and economists digging into the euro system have been shocked, shocked, in tones that echo “Casablanca’sCaptain Renault, to discover leverage and risk in the system.

And once you head down that path, well, the scenery gets mighty gothic mighty quickly. We wind up with economists saying things like, “In a euro breakup Germany will lose to 20% of its GDP when debtors renege on their Target2 liabilities” or, “The official sector (read the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund) are owed 290 billion euros by Greece. Of that 120 billion amounts to Target2 liabilities.”

These are real issues only if 1) the euro does break up, and 2) levels of trust sink to such low levels that, like Byzantine mercenaries, no party in Europe is willing to trust the currency or its bookkeeping systems. Even in the event of a euro breakup, the Bundesbank could simply print money or write itself a check, in the words of University College Dublin economics professor Karl Whelan, to cover what it’s owed. That would seem a reasonable alternative to trying to extract 576 billion euros (or whatevers) from German taxpayers to cover what is, from one perspective, a bookkeeping entity.

Of course, you can do things like print money or write yourself a check (and then not cash it, of course) only if trust in the system hasn’t vanished. As the slow runs on Spanish banks (and the not-so-slow runs on Greek banks) demonstrate, though, there’s not a lot of trust in the eurozone financial system.

And I think we’re only a resentful and shortsighted Greek election result — and a ham-handed political reaction from the German, Finnish, Austrian and Dutch governments — away from a decisive erosion in trust in the euro. The European Central Bank has already made it clear that it is not prepared to be a Federal Reserve-style lender of last resort.

So who, exactly, does stand behind the euro? Not eurozone governments, it’s clear — they can’t agree to issue joint eurobonds. Not the Bundesbank, the strongest of the national central banks, which clearly thinks it has done enough.

Click here to become a fan of MSN Money on Facebook

 

So who, then, thinks the euro is worth defending and who would spend some billions on defense if that were what it took?

Paper poses

And if the euro can dissolve, if the eurozone can go back to Deutschmarks and drachmas, then why should we have faith in any paper currency? The breakup of the euro won’t mean the breakup of the dollar or the yen or the real, but it sure would accelerate the search for a more secure depository of value than paper money. Even one that proclaims “In God we trust.”

2)ENTREVISTA A PAUL KRUGMAN

“Si España no tiene éxito en esta crisis, el euro tampoco lo tendrá”

Paul Krugman pide una mayor intervención del BCE para solucionar la crisis europea

Madrid3 JUL 2012 – 00:00 CET383
Paul Krugman, premio Nobel de Economía 2008. / SAMUEL SÁNCHEZ

Físicamente, Paul Krugman (EE UU, 1953) ha cambiado poco en los últimos tres años. Pero su discurso sí lo ha hecho. Y mucho. Ya no pide un recorte de salarios del 30%, ni onerosos planes de gasto público, sino que pide al Banco Central Europeo (BCE) que actúe. Su disciplina y puntualidad tampoco han cambiado. Se entrega a la promoción de su nuevo libro ¡Acabad ya con esta crisis! con infinita paciencia. Café en mano, eso sí, que el encuentro se celebra a primera hora de la mañana.

Pregunta. Imagine que soy un ahorrador español, ¿qué debo hacer con mi dinero?

Respuesta. ¡Dios mío! No quiero ser responsable de los ahorros de nadie. Pero hay una posibilidad real de que el euro se rompa. Lo impensable es ahora posible. Obviamente no daría un consejo concreto, pero es una situación muy complicada y podría ser que algunas personas perdieran parte del valor de sus ahorros. No creo que estemos hablando de una situación catastrófica, pero tampoco de nada bueno.

P. ¿Qué probabilidad le otorga a la ruptura del euro?

R. Aún pienso que es menos probable que su salvación, pero por poco margen. Antes creía que la probabilidad era de uno contra cinco y ahora creo que es el doble, un 40%, porque la distancia entre lo que tendría que hacerse para salvar el euro y lo que la política ha puesto por ahora encima de la mesa es todavía muy grande.

P. ¿Y aún ve la posibilidad de un corralito en España?

El BCE debería permitir

un mayor objetivo de inflación, del 3%

R. Eso se enmarcaría en una ruptura del euro. No pretendía montar tanto barullo cuando lo dije [en una entrada de su blog]. Es algo que se aplicaría hasta que se introdujera la nueva divisa. Pero no es algo que vaya a pasar así como así.

P. ¿Le afectaron las críticas del Gobierno español?

R. Es normal que un Gobierno no quiera que un economista provoque pánico, yo no lo pretendo tampoco, pero tampoco quiero ser deshonesto. Por supuesto, un Gobierno siempre dirá que esto nunca va a ocurrir. Es una de las reglas de las devaluaciones, se niega hasta que sucede. Estoy seguro de que el Gobierno no tiene intención de hacer nada de esto y que todo el mundo quiere seguir perteneciendo al euro y salvarlo. Pero también espero que alguien esté haciendo planes de contingencia. La situación es muy difícil.

P. Ha dicho que ve pocas diferencias entre las políticas de Rajoy y las de Zapatero.

R. Creo que hubieran hecho cosas muy distintas con un superávit de las cuentas públicas pero no en una situación como la actual. Parecía que iba a llegar Rajoy y se iba a solucionar todo, y lo cierto es que no ha cambiado las políticas del anterior Gobierno porque ambos tienen poco margen de maniobra.

P. ¿Cree que el rescate a la banca que ha solicitado España será suficiente o hará falta más?

R. España necesita un rescate de su sector bancario y necesita que se haga bien. Lo que pasó hace tres semanas fue un desastre, tanto que empeoró las cosas. El acuerdo de la reciente cumbre europea sí se parece más a un rescate para los bancos en problemas, los riesgos se comparten y no son asumidos en solitario por el Gobierno español, pero no resuelve el problema. Tampoco creo que un rescate soberano sea la respuesta, basta con ver lo que ha sucedido en Grecia o en Irlanda, donde no se ve atisbo de recuperación. Ni siquiera creo que haya recursos suficientes para un rescate a la griega de España. Lo que España necesita es un cambio en la política macroeconómica europea, que el BCE compre bonos para reducir los tipos. España no está en situación de decir “vengan a rescatarnos”, sino que necesita que cambie la política monetaria.

P. ¿Económica también?

R. Básicamente política monetaria. El BCE es el único que tiene herramientas suficientes para actuar. España tiene la desventaja de ser demasiado grande para ser rescatada, al estilo de Portugal, pero tiene la ventaja de que si España no tiene éxito, el euro tampoco. Así que el destino de España es el destino del euro.

Lo que España necesita es que el Banco Central compre bonos

P. ¿Los últimos acuerdos lograrán salvar al euro?

R. Ha sido una cumbre mejor que las anteriores. La propuesta bancaria tiene sentido y, hasta donde sabemos, el resto de los acuerdos parecen razonables. Pero sobre todo dejan de limitar el foco de la UE a la austeridad. Aunque estos pasos están lejos de ser suficientes, son apenas un 5% de lo que se necesita hacer. A no ser que haya más medidas, el euro no se habrá salvado.

P. Acaba de presentar un manifiesto en favor del sentido común económico.

R. La idea es que hay que hacer algo para contrarrestar la austeridad. Los hogares tienen que reducir su deuda y el Gobierno español no puede lanzar una política de estímulos en este momento. Alemania podría y debería hacerlo y el BCE debería facilitar liquidez tanto a los Gobiernos como a la economía en general para provocar un aumento de la inflación. El problema esencial de la economía española, de la banca, es que se produce un agujero por el estallido de la burbuja inmobiliaria y eso hay que compensarlo con menor déficit comercial. No es una estrategia fácil. Irlanda lleva dos años y medio aplicando esa estrategia y parece claro que no va a funcionar.

P. ¿Servirá de algo el plan de crecimiento de la UE?

R. Es un paso en la buena dirección, aunque apenas supone el 1% del PIB. Quizás pueda reducir alguna décima la tasa de paro de la UE, pero nada más. De todas formas, no creo que se pueda hacer mucho por el lado fiscal, al contrario que en EE UU. En España, el buen desempeño fiscal de antes de la crisis fue, en buena medida, gracias a la burbuja, así que ahora tiene que hacer un fuerte ajuste para atajar el déficit fiscal estructural, aunque quizás no tan rápido. No sabemos si eso funcionará, pero es la única bala.

P. ¿Debería elevar el BCE su objetivo de inflación?

R. Claramente. En un mundo ideal debería estar en el 4%, como sugiere el economista jefe del FMI, Olivier Blanchard, pero el 3% no está mal. El objetivo actual del 2% es, en realidad, un techo, así que los mercados interpretan la meta de estabilidad en torno al 1%, que no es aceptable. Ahora no es posible un objetivo inferior al 3% durante los próximos cinco años.

P. ¿Y ampliar su mandato?

R. Sería muy útil, aunque no creo que sea posible. Hace cinco años se podía discutir si una inflación estable y un desempeño aceptable de la economía real eran la misma cosa, pero ahora ya sabemos que no. Es posible, gracias a las continuas bajadas salariales, tener un extenso periodo de precios estables con una economía deprimida. Así que el mandato único del BCE es muy limitado.

P. ¿Pone Europa en peligro a la economía mundial?

R. Sin duda, aunque a nadie le va bien, ni a los emergentes. Estados Unidos solo tiene mejor escenario por comparación con Europa. Mi tesis es que hay dos problemas estructurales que hay que atajar: uno es Europa, que tiene una moneda común, sin un Gobierno común; y otro, EE UU, donde uno de los dos principales partidos está literalmente loco. Y esa combinación hace que la recuperación sea muy difícil.

P. Usted defiende que hay crecientes parecidos con los años 30.

R. Creo que cada vez es más obvio que Europa se asemeja mucho a aquella época e incluso algunas economías europeas están peor en términos de PIB o paro de lo que estaban en los años 30. EE UU está prácticamente igual, España está sustancialmente peor e Italia, también. No así Alemania, pero aquella fue una época terrible para ese país. Y la incapacidad para responder de forma efectiva es muy similar. El escenario político no es tan malo como en los años 30, pero estamos viendo un aumento del extremismo, así que los paralelismos son muchos.

P. ¿No hemos aprendido ninguna lección?

R. Creo que hemos aprendido que no era una buena idea dejar caer al sistema bancario y hemos evitado el gran colapso financiero de 1931 aunque, viendo lo que está haciendo Europa, es difícil estar seguro incluso de eso. El resto es aterrador. Los discursos de David Cameron o de Angela Merkel son muy parecidos a los de Herbert Hoover en 1932. Así que ahí no hemos aprendido nada.

Anuncios

Etiquetas: , , ,

7 comentarios to ““Una chispa puede incendiar toda una pradera”, Mao.”

  1. Anete Says:

    this blog rocks.http://www.scottwestern.com

  2. Puppies for Sale in Old Beaver Idaho Says:

    Great delivery. Outstanding arguments. Keep up the amazing work.

  3. travestis en valencia Says:

    I think that is one of the most vital info for me. And i am glad studying your article. However should remark on few general issues, The site taste is perfect, the articles is in reality excellent : D. Excellent activity, cheers

  4. www.villaranvideo.es Says:

    Valuable info. Lucky me I discovered your site unintentionally, and I’m stunned why this accident did not took place earlier! I bookmarked it.

  5. extang bed covers Says:

    Fine way of describing, and fastidious post
    to take data on the topic of my presentation focus, which
    i am going to present in academy.

  6. cubiertas de piscina motorizadas Says:

    Woah this blog is excellent i love reading your posts. Keep up the good work! You understand, lots of individuals are hunting round for this information, you could aid them greatly.

  7. rutas en bicicleta asturias Says:

    Habitaba investigando informacion a su respecto. Debido por oriente tema. �Como me suscribo a su feed sobre noticias?

Responder

Introduce tus datos o haz clic en un icono para iniciar sesión:

Logo de WordPress.com

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de WordPress.com. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Imagen de Twitter

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Twitter. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Foto de Facebook

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Facebook. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Google+ photo

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Google+. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Conectando a %s


A %d blogueros les gusta esto: